Friday, May 24, 2019

NEW LOOK! NEW IDC! GO CHECK IT OUT!









We had a fun day @inlanddesigncenter yesterday. Reconnecting with old friends and seeing that they have gone through some big changes!!! Fresh off an acquisition by ProSource of Southern California, IDC has a new invigorated look and feel. I am so excited to see this new look and how much they have changed. With 40+ years of experience, Diane Paul has reminded us that you can still make a difference in how you experience the world around you. If your a designer and are looking for resources for your projects, this is the place to be! #IDC#colorturners #prosource #ASID#NKBA #IDS #CCIDC#interiordesigngoals #interiordesign

*INLAND DESIGN CENTER IS OPEN TO THE TRADE ONLY

For Designers and Contractors Looking for Resources;
Contact: 
Diane Paul OR Michael Espinoza 
Main: 909-931-1778


CCIDC




Had a fun day filming an informational video about CCIDC (Certification for Interior Design).
The information is about the history of Certification, the qualifications for certification and how to become a Certified Interior Designer/CID. Stay tuned for our next up date. 



The California Council for Interior Design Certification (CCIDC), established in January 1992, the organization, responsible for administering the California Certified Interior Designers Title Act, under Chapter 3.9, Section 5800 of the California Business and Professions Code.
Title Act went into effect on January 1, 1991, after several years of legislative efforts by commercial and residential interior design groups and by the California Legislative Coalition for Interior Design. The law SB 153 outlined the parameters and responsibilities of work that an interior designer can perform. Along with these guidelines, the title of “Certified Interior Designer” added to the California Business and Professions code, providing an official designation for interior designers who meet the education, experience and examination requirements, as administered by the California Council for Interior Design Certification (CCIDC).
CCIDC, in accordance with all State boards and non-profit boards, is accountable to the sunset review process enacted by both the Assembly and Senate of the California legislature. Reviewed every 5 years, or as determined by the legislature for compliance with the statute they administer and are subject to sunset (elimination) if determined to be out of compliance. CCIDC is also subject to the Bagley–Keene Act, a statute specifically enacted only for the operational oversight of all California State boards and commissions.

Tuesday, May 21, 2019

Power Up Your Business with Color & Light






















By Renee Lim M. D. & Denise Turner, ASID, CID, CMG

Color and light are two of nature’s strongest influencers. As entrepreneurs, how can we ignore such powerful influencers? Can color and light help us get wealthier, healthier, happier? Absolutely yes! 

What is Color Therapy? 
Color therapy uses the visible spectrum of color and light to balance a person’s mood, as well as mental and physical health. The therapeutic use of color and light to restore health has been used by humans for centuries, from ancient cultures to modern doctors, scientists and color therapists. Color therapy is gaining popularity today as a result of medical research reflecting its benefits and the advent of Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs). 
Color therapy can increase your energy to help you make more sales, help increase productivity in your team, and help you build your business! By using the right color and light combinations you can increase health benefits and your overall vitality! 
An amazing story of the power that color and light has over your body and mind comes from Denise’s work as a color specialist. A few years ago, Denise was hired to redesign a master bedroom suite. She learned that around the time her client’s son had redecorated his room, he had begun to experience grand mal seizures and had been put on medication. When Denise entered his room she found black walls, black curtains, and black furniture. It was like walking into a cave. Denise convinced him to change his bedroom’s color scheme. The walls were repainted, and windows opened to allow light in the room. Within weeks after these changes, the grand mal seizures stopped. His doctor eventually took him off the medication and said it was an “unexplainable recovery.” But we say, give credit where credit is due, and the credit goes to color and light! 
If color and light can impact someone this much, just imagine what it can do for your business, and your productivity! If color and light can help this young man live such a drastically higher quality of life, what could it do for you? 
But not every color affects every person in the same way. In-fact, depending on a person’s cultural background, certain color combinations can be considered irritating or unacceptable in certain social settings. If someone has a past trauma associated with a color or hue, the reaction to it will not be as expected. The length of time spent in certain visible color or invisible light can have different effects on people. Be sensitive and wise with your choices in your business. If you wish to use colors, consult an experienced color specialist. 
But that doesn’t mean. You cant use color and light in your every day life to help create a more productive life! Here are some practical tips you can implement before your meeting with Renee and Denise!
Practical Tips 
Some Impact of Colors and Light
  • Yellow is an ideal color for environments in which creative activity and socialization is desired. Its bright and cheering effect has been associated with lowered levels of depression, stimulation of the immune system, and enhanced concentration. 
  • Green has a sedative, cooling effect, making it a wonderful choice in a stressful situation. Nature makes the most use of this color.
According to a research paper published by the International Journal of Architectural Research, viewing nature for 10 minutes prior to experiencing a mental stressor has been shown to stimulate heart rate variability and parasympathetic activity (Brown, Barton & Gladwell, 2013).
  • Blue is associated with reduced blood pressure, heart and respiration rate, and an overall calming effect. When we are not in fight and flight mode, we rest better, think clearer, and our stamina is longer. Exposure to blue, for instance in looking at a blue sky, has been associated with a reduction of symptoms of headache and some nervous disorders, enhanced attention span, alertness, reaction times, mood, and sleep. To promote restful sleep, both Renee and Denise recommend blues and greens on the walls or curtains.
  • Red is the longest visible wavelength; it’s hot, has both physical and mental stimulating effects, and is associated with increased vitality and energy. Looking for an energy or confidence booster? Search no more! This mega passionate hue radiates power, energy, and helps to combat laziness and lethargy. A potent color, red has also been associated with increased adrenaline and elevated blood pressure, which triggers the fight or flight response.
  • Ultraviolet Light, on the invisible part of the color spectrum, also impacts health. Our favorite sunshine vitamin D is made when we are exposed to UV light. The same UV is also used to treat psoriasis and disinfect hospitals. However, it is also associated with incidence of skin cancer. Take a short lunch or walk outdoor every day to take advantage of this free influencer, but also respect its power to cause damage. 
There are many technologies that make use of the invisible range of the light spectrum to modulate various functions in the body. Many seek to improve blood circulation, stimulate the brain for memory improvement, detoxify the body, improve fitness, disinfect blood, and encourage anti-aging effects. The wearable technologies are much more convenient and practical than traditional machines that cannot be lugged around. The latest technology Renee has found is smaller than a dollar note, and as light as the dollar itself. In addition, it can influence the body to produce many health benefits without having to carry or use multiple technologies. 

Imagine using light therapy every day to increase your energy, decrease pain, and help you breakdown barriers in your business. How many more sales could you make? How much quicker could you finish your work to spend time where it matters most? 

Dr. Renee Lim and Denise Turner ASID, CID, CMG, have studied and personally used color therapy to enhance their lives, so what is stopping you? 

Luckily you now have full access to these two amazing professionals to help you use light therapy to increase your business and personal life! 














To learn more about how color and light therapy can help you build a life you love, reach out to 
Renee Lim, M.D. and Denise Turner, ASID, CID, CMG

Renee Lim, M.D. is a Family Medicine Specialist in San Diego, California. She is board certified with American Board of Anti-Aging Regenerative Medicine and Fellow in Anti-Aging Regenerative and Functional Medicine. She particularly pursues advanced developments in the fields of stem cells, peptides, energy medicine and cost effective, non-invasive, safe healing modalities.
To reach out to Dr. Lim, contact her at BeWell@DrReneeLim.com. 
Tel:  760-450-5974
https://www.linkedin.com/in/renee-lim-m-d-570690186/

Denise Turner masterfully navigates two worlds of color. As an international, award-winning interior designer and colorist, she helps businesses to drive sales with color. As a ColorTherapy expert and Energy Medicine healer, she utilizes color to empower others to heal themselves and their families. Turner is an ASID (American Society of Interior Designers) professional member, Certified Interior Designer, former CMG (Color Marketing Group) Board of Director, former ASID chapter president, and UCLA graduate.

denise@Colorturners.com 

www.colorturners.com 



Friday, April 26, 2019

Balancing Colors For Design


The 60-30-10 Design Rule: 

Designing with color is as simple as 60-30-10. Don’t take my word for itjust look at any award-winning design, and you will find that almost invariably the design is divided into these percentages. You will see this in nature too.

This tried-and-true design rule will make your color choices so easy that you’ll wonder why everyone else doesn’t follow it.

How to Use the 60-30-10 Rule

60% is the dominant color that anchors the space and serves as a backdrop for other items. In a family room, the 60% would most likely be composed of the walls and ceiling, as well as large accent pieces, such as sectional and area rugs.

30% is the secondary color, which supports the dominant color, yet is different enough to provide contrast and visual interest in the room. In many rooms, the 30% can be made up of window coverings, painted furniture, flooring, accent chairs and bed linens.


10% is the accent color. This is the fun part that usually gives a room its personality. An accent color can be pulled from other items in the room, such as printed fabrics, rugs, or artwork. In a living room, the accent color can be found in throw pillows, decorative accessories, plants, and artwork. In a bedroom, it can be found in accent pillows on the bed, a table lamp on a nightstand, and plants. 

Denise Turner-masterfully navigates two worlds of color. As an international, award-winning interior designer and colorist, she helps businesses to drive sales with color. As a ColorTherapy expert and Energy Medicine healer, she utilizes color to empower others to heal themselves and their families. Turner is an ASID (American Society of Interior Designers) professional member, Certified Interior Designer, former CMG (Color Marketing Group) Board of Director, former ASID chapter president, and UCLA graduate.
denise@Colorturners.com 





Photo by Deniz Altindas on Unsplash

Friday, April 19, 2019

Color Therapy Your Home Class


Women on the Move Network & Color Turners invite you to a
Color Therapy Your Home Class
at our women’s empowerment workshop with
color expert Denise Turner

 

Color is the most important design element in your home. It can effect your physical and emotional health, influence your mood, energy level, creativity, and overall well being. Yet choosing the “CORRECT” paint color is the one thing that scares people the most
You Will:
  • Explore the science behind Color Therapy, its origin and history, and how it’s used today.
  • Learn how-to incorporate these easy principles to create harmony in your own home
  • Experience Color-Kinesiology through energetic touch. Then see how the right colors can strengthen and how the wrong colors can weaken the physical body.
  • Learn the best colors for kids’s spaces (including children with Autism, ADD/ADHD).
May 10th @ 12:00-1:30pmRancho Cucamonga Family Resource Center9791 Arrow Route, Rancho Cucamonga 91730Please RSVP to wotmnetwork9@gmail.comor by phone to 909-982-1210

Denise Turner ASID, CID, CMG is a Color Therapy Expert, Certified Interior Designer, speaker, author, design trend forecaster and president of the Color Turners. She specializes in using color to create harmonious spaces.

Wednesday, April 10, 2019

Color & Employees’ Health


By Denise Turner, ASID, CID, CMG
Color Turners

Although often overlooked in the workday bustle, the colors of your office can impact your co-workers’ and employees’ health and productivity. Scientists have known that colors in our environment can affect our health by stimulating the nervous system and influencing the body’s physiology and mental states.

Here are some tips for utilizing color to decrease stress, improve morale, and reduce employees’ sick days. 

Color studies show that people are less stressed, more confident and have improved productivity when working in offices that are either painted blue or have blue furniture in them. Blues and greens are also ideal colors for environments that require quiet and extended concentration and high visual acuity.

Blues and greens radiate a calming effect. They are perfect for high stress environments such as hospitals, airports and courthouses. Additionally, cool colors are a great antidote for hypertensive, agitated, or anxious individuals and are preferred by those in professions which require a calm environment and visual precision, such as doctors, teachers, and yoga instructors.

Yellows and reds are ideal colors for environments in which creative activity and socialization is desired. These colors are also highly effective at combating depression.

On the other hand, inappropriate or incompatible colors can have adverse effects on your personnel’s moods. For example, pure white interiors can cause eye strain and headaches, especially when combined with fluorescent lighting. So, if you choose to paint your interior white, go for an off-white. It’s much easier on the eyes.

Using color to highlight important information can help your customers stay safe. Yellow is the first color that our eyes see. When it’s joined with black, the two become the universal color combination for “warning.” Nature uses yellow warning signs on the world’s most poisonous creatures. Likewise, street warning signs and school buses are in OSHA yellow.

In business, important technical information, warning signs, and safety notices are more likely to be remembered if they’re in color. This can help decrease accidents and expensive insurance claims.

Have you ever spent a ton of precious time drowning in a sea of black and white paperwork? Research shows that the 1.5 hours you and your employee spend reading black and white documents can be reduced to 0.5 just by adding color. By capitalizing on color, you’ll significantly improve your company’s efficiency and it’ll free you up to focus on more important things, like billable hours.


What do you need to see before before going into a stressful situation? According to a research paper published by the International Journal of Architectural Research, viewing nature for 10 minutes prior to experiencing a mental stressor has shown to stimulate heart rate variability and parasympathetic activity (i.e. regulation of internal organs and glands that support digestion and other activities that occur when the body is at rest) (Brown, Barton & Gladwell, 2013).
What if a mental stressor comes unexpectedly? Viewing a forest scene for 20 minutes after a mental stressor has shown to return cerebral blood flow and brain activity to a relaxed state (Tsunetsugu & Miyazaki, 2005). 



Denise Turner-masterfully navigates two worlds of color. As an international, award-winning interior designer and colorist, she helps businesses to drive sales with color. As a ColorTherapy expert and Energy Medicine healer, she utilizes color to empower others to heal themselves and their families. Turner is an ASID (American Society of Interior Designers) professional member, Certified Interior Designer, former CMG (Color Marketing Group) Board of Director, former ASID chapter president, and UCLA graduate.
denise@Colorturners.com 
www.colorturners.com 
https://www.facebook.com/denise.turner.188478

Sunday, March 24, 2019

Color Therapy's Roots


























By Denise Turner, ASID, CID, CMG
Color Turners 


For as long as humans have walked the earth, we have worshipped the sun, its source of light (or lack thereof), and been instinctively aware of its profound effect on us. 

Thousands of years ago, several cultures began exploring color and its healing capabilities. Peoples of Egypt, Greece, and China were the trailblazers in color healing and therapy.

The therapeutic use of color in its modern sense can be traced back to 4th century Greece. The philosopher Hippocrates, referred to as the “Father of Modern Medicine,” used different colored ointments and plasters on wounds. In The Complete Book of Color Healing, author Lilian Verner-Bonds cites that Aristotle used different colored salves, minerals, crystals, and dyes as remedies. Aulus Cornelius Celsus, a legendary physician in first-century Rome, exclusively used color to treat his patients. When Christianity emerged in the 1st century AD, however, many of the ancient wisdoms and practices were expelled and deemed “pagan.” 

Color therapy advancements were dormant from the Middle Ages until the Renaissance in the 14th century and the Age of Discovery from the 15th to 18th centuries. Superstitions of the Middle Ages were superseded by the newly discovered “science.” As Verner-Bonds further explains, during this period many societies experimented with the use of color, both therapeutically and decoratively. Minerals of different colors were crushed to make pigments for paint and dyes for textiles. Pigments and dyes were also used in making medicines. Paracelsus (1493-1541), one of the greatest physicians of the Renaissance period, used color as a means to treat physical and mental disorders.

Today’s understanding of color is rooted in the work of Sir Isaac Newton. In 1666, he passed light through a prism and established a new theory, which stated that “white light is itself made up all the colors of the rainbow.” Newton was also the first to divide light into the seven colors of the spectrum. Newton believed that light and color were particles that moved in a straight line. Newton’s contemporary, scientist Robert Hooke (1635-1703), believed they were waves. Actually, they were both correct.

By the early 20th century, medical advancements led to a rise in scientific exploration into the healing aspect of light and color. Dr. Dinshah P. Ghadiali (1873-1966) began healing his patients with different colored lights, calling his procedure “Spectro-Chrome Therapy,” known today as Chromotherapy.

In 1903, physician Niels Finsen was awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine for his work on the use of light and color in healing disease. He devised the red light treatment of smallpox (1893) and the treatment of lupus by means of concentrated light rays (1895). Today, light therapy is still a common form of therapy to treat mood and eating disorders.

The October 2011 issue of Psychology Today reported: 
“People with a tendency to oversleep and overeat are more likely to respond to light therapy than others. If one is treating a mood disorder, light therapy is best given for a duration of 30 minutes for every hour one sleeps beyond 6 hours. So, for example, [a person who sleeps 8 hours] would require one hour of light therapy given one hour before they would normally wake. Since this is unlikely to be done by people who already feel the need for more sleep, it is best to use a dawn simulator light.” 

By the middle of the 20th century, Faber Birren had laid the foundation for color therapy. He blended together various color theory and color therapy concepts and his research is still used by design scholars today. 

Apart from the practice of color as a therapy, color is also widely used in psychological testing today. Psychotherapist Dr. Max Lüscher (b. 1923) developed a simple, yet effective, diagnostic test based on color. “The Dr. Lüscher Color Test” is widely used by psychologists, psychiatrists, and physicians. 

Today, architects, interior designers, and color consultants continue to explore color’s psychological and physiological effects and create healthful environments that enable people to flourish. The medical profession continues to make scientific advancements in the use of color through ultraviolet and infrared light. Industrial psychologists, experts in scientific study of human behavior in the workplace, are well aware of color’s effect on workers’ health. 

Although we’ve come a long way in our knowledge of color theory and therapy, there’s still more to explore. Who knows? The cure for diabetes, cancer, or HIV/AIDS might be sitting at the end of the rainbow. 

Denise Turner-masterfully navigates two worlds of color. As an international, award-winning interior designer and colorist, she helps businesses to drive sales with color. As a ColorTherapy expert and Energy Medicine healer, she utilizes color to empower others to heal themselves and their families. Turner is an ASID (American Society of Interior Designers) professional member, Certified Interior Designer, former CMG (Color Marketing Group) Board of Director, former ASID chapter president, and UCLA graduate.denise@Colorturners.com www.colorturners.com